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Postby kate_turner2000 » Wed Mar 14, 2007 9:22 am

Wednesday 14th March

TIP # 51 BIGGEST LOSER 10 STEPS TO WEIGHTLOSS SUCCESS

1. be accountable
2. change to healthy food
3. get organised
4. eat breakfast
5. eat 3-6 meals a day
6. reduce ur portion sizes
7. manage where and how you eat
8. get moving
9. ask for support
10. change your attitude and be committed

*extract from the biggest loser: change your life published by Hardie Grant books rrp: $34.95

Thursday 15th March

TIP # 52 7 BIGGEST LOSER STEPS TO FITNESS SUCCESS

1. be accountable
2. ask for support
3. create good habits
4. set achievable goals
5. inspire others
6. mix it up
7. choose a positive attitude

*extract from the biggest loser: change your life published by Hardie Grant books rrp: $34.95
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Postby Ally » Wed Mar 14, 2007 12:08 pm

Do you have the book Kate??? I was thinking of getting it!
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Postby kate_turner2000 » Wed Mar 14, 2007 12:16 pm

no ally i dont unfortunately, the rest of the extract that came from had some recipes too, i will email them to you and you can tell me what u think in terms of nutritional value
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Postby Ally » Wed Mar 14, 2007 12:34 pm

no worries mate...will do that for you!!
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Postby kate_turner2000 » Thu Mar 15, 2007 3:51 pm

Friday 16th March

TIP #53 WATERMELON

A good source of vitamin c, it's also rich in lycopene- a powerful antioxident believed to reduce the incidence of certain cancers. It's also fat free, with just 95kJ per 100g.

*take 5 March 21 2007
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Postby kate_turner2000 » Sat Mar 17, 2007 8:51 pm

Saturday 17th March

TIP # 54 When starting a walking program

Plan your walking route before you go to sleep and have your exercise gear ready for the next day so there's no excuse - don't put your dressing gown on when you wake up, instead step into your walking gear.
Put your walking shoes by the front door so you can't miss them.
Don't be put off by the weather. Think it's too hot to go for a walk? Go early in the morning or later in the day. You say it's too cold outside? Well, now you're being a wuss, because walking will warm you up and if you don't go you'll feel terrible.
Have a drink of water before you head off and take a bottle of water with you.
Try interval training or alternate your regular pace with five minutes at a quicker pace, and then return to your regular, easier pace. Or even try a few minutes on a skipping rope or box with your partner.
Always try to have a walking buddy - it makes it much harder for you to opt out of exercising.
Try to weight train two to three times a week as well as walking. This will help reduce the risk of developing osteoporosis.

*NEW IDEA ONLINE LIFESTYLE MOVE IT AND LOSE IT - JAN 16
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Postby kate_turner2000 » Sat Mar 17, 2007 8:55 pm

Sunday 18th March

TIP #55 THE SEVEN CHAKRAS (fyi)

Chakras are a core belief of yoga, and have been incorporated into many different new age practices. The chakra system was first developed in India in the middle ages. The word "chakra" is a sanskrit word meaning wheel.

The major chakras are located along the spinal column of the body and each is traditionally represented by a different color of the rainbow - starting with red at the bottom up to violet on the crown.

Each chakra location represents different emotions and feelings.

Ideally all the chakras should be balanced - open and spinning at a similar rate to each other. Most of us however have some chakras which are overactive and others that are closed down or underactive.

First Chakra: Root
Colour: Red
Governs survival instincts, physical functions, sense of groundedness
Signs of imbalance include constipation, obesity, leg or knee problems

Second Chakra: Sacral
Colour: Orange
Governs sexuality, emotion, nurturing instincts, creativity
Signs of imbalance include low-back pain, reproductive issues, bladder or kidney troubles

Third Chakra: Solar Plexus
Colour: Yellow
Governs will, drive, ego, control, freedom, metabolism
Signs of imbalance include ulcers, digestive disorders, liver and gallbladder ailments, diabetes

Fourth Chakra: Heart
Colour: Green
Governs love, compassion, relationships
Signs of imbalance are heart disease, high blood pressure

Fifth Chakra: Throat
Colour: Blue
Governs communication, creativity, self-expression
Signs of imbalance include sore throat, laryngitis, thyroid imbalance, respiratory and/or hearing problems

Sixth Chakra: Brow
Colour: Indigo
Governs intuition, thought, psychic awareness, dreams, visions
Signs of imbalance include headaches, problems with the nervous system

Seventh Chakra: Crown
Colour: Violet
Governs cosmic consciousness, spirituality, wisdom, universal truth
Signs of imbalance include confusion, depression, inability to learn


*when i used to do yoga our teacher used to discuss all this chakra stuff with us and she would relate a lot of the yoga positions to it. very interesting!*

NEW IDEA HEALTH THE 7 CHAKRAS DEC 05
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Postby kate_turner2000 » Sat Mar 17, 2007 8:57 pm

Monday 19th March

TIP # 56 WALKING TIPS

Walking is an excellent form of exercise for people of all ages and abilities.

Start your walking program gradually, increasing length and pace as you get used to it. The following suggestions may help you to incorporate regular walking into your lifestyle.

If you have not walked distances for some time, you should start slowly. Increase the length and pace of your walk gradually. Here are some tips on how to get started and how to prepare for walking.

Warm-up activity - start slowly, do a few warm-up exercises and stretches first. Don't walk immediately after a big meal.

Build activity slowly - start with a 20 minute walk then increase gradually. Try to walk at least three times per week.

Use the correct technique - walk at a steady pace, swing your arms freely and stand as straight as you can. Your feet should step in a rolling action from the heel to the toe.

Shoes and socks- wear thick comfortable cotton socks. Sensible, comfortable and lightweight shoes with support are best.

Weather - wear suitable warm, light clothing in the winter and cool, comfortable clothes in the summer. Don't forget your sunscreen and hat.

Water- drink water before and after your walk. Take water with you on your walk, especially in warm weather.

Cool down - make sure you cool down after a long fast walk. Do a few stretching exercises.


*new idea health walking tips nov 22
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Postby kate_turner2000 » Tue Mar 20, 2007 12:58 pm

Tuesday 20th March

TIP #57 NON STICK

1. Nonstick: Stock up on nonstick pans for baking and grilling, breads and cookies, sautéing and even for soup. Nonstick is one of life’s little pleasures because you don't need oil. Instead use a little cooking spray, wine, water or juice.
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Postby kate_turner2000 » Tue Mar 20, 2007 1:05 pm

Wednesday 21st March

TIP # 58 BODY IMAGE

Body image exercises
Some of the following might seem quite difficult, but do give them a go. Come back and try again another time if need be. The more you challenge what you think about your body and yourself, the better and more positive you'll (rightly) feel.


Health tip
Start each day with a positive statement about yourself. Say it a few times.

List four things you like about your personality, day-to-day achievements (no matter how large or small) or any aspect of yourself.
List four things a close friend might say they like about your appearance.
List four positive things about your body, any part of it - hair, nails, waist, eyes, toes, smile, ankles.
Think how you respond when someone pays you a compliment. Do you brush it aside or believe it and say thanks? If not the latter, practise this new response.
Start each day with a positive statement about yourself. Say it a few times.


Feel-good tips

Try to separate self-esteem from body image. You are the sum of many wonderful and varied parts.
Having a more positive body image can help you to achieve weight-loss goals such as being more active.
Despite our 'slim obsessed' society, the effects on health are the main thing to be truly concerned about if you're very overweight, rather than appearance.
Keep your expectations about goal weights and rate of loss realistic. Remember, we all have different and unique body shapes.
Seek professional help if your feel that your body dissatisfaction is very distressing and stops you from achieving the changes you want.


This article was last medically reviewed by Dr Rob Hicks in October 2005.
First published in May 2001.
BBC





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Postby kate_turner2000 » Thu Mar 22, 2007 10:35 am

Thursday 22nd March

TIP #59 BMI & WAIST-HIP RATIO



Waist-hip ratio
Recently, it's been suggested that waist-hip ratio, which measures the proportion of fat stored on your body around your waist and hips, is the best predictor of a person's risk of a heart attack, making it a more accurate measure than BMI.

Measure your waist-hip ratio while standing relaxed and naked. Measure your waist at its narrowest point. This is usually around your navel. Next, measure your hips at their widest point. Most often this is around the buttocks. It's important not to pull the tape tight when doing either of these measurements - let the tape rest on your skin.

Finally, divide your waist measurement by your hip measurement.The figure you get from this calculation is your waist-hip ratio. For example, if your waist is 85cm (33in) and your hips are 100cm (39in), your waist-hip ratio is 0.85.

If you're a man and your ratio is more than 1.0, or a woman and your waist-hip ratio is more than 0.8, it means you're an apple shape and at greater risk of health problems.

Any future for BMI?
The emerging research suggesting that BMI is no longer the best predictor of future health problems doesn't mean you should ignore your BMI. It still has some value as a rough screening tool. However, it's become clear that fat deposited around the waist is a more important risk marker.

Don't forget, however, that abdominal fat is only one risk factor. Smoking, drinking too much alcohol, a lack of exercise, an unhealthy diet and stress are other important illness risk factors that also need to be addressed.


*BBC.CO.UK HEALTH
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Postby kate_turner2000 » Thu Mar 22, 2007 10:37 am

Friday 23rd March

TIP #60 STYLE TIPS FOR WOMEN

Short
Don't wear horizontal stripes, too many colours at once, too many or big accessories, or bags slungs across the body. Avoid the layered look.


Don't wear trousers with turn-ups or wide legs. Don't buy trousers that are too long and chop them; that only alters the fit and not for the better. Avoid short A-line skirts and large prints.


Do wear outfits in one colour, slim-fitting straight-leg trousers. You can look leggy by wearing a skirt, tights and shoes in the same tones. Wear simple lines and keep to small accessories.


Do scour petite ranges and teenage girls' sections. Wear one button jackets done up above the waistline.


Tall
Don't wear clothes with vertical lines, patterns or pinstripes.


Don't wear one colour head to toe or crop tops. Don't carry tiny handbags or wear small earrings or necklaces.


Do wear low kitten heels rather than completely flat shoes. Try layering and skirts with a frill around the bottom or a patterned hem.


Do wear low-waisted bootcut or straight-leg trousers and jeans. Don't be afraid to carry bigger handbags or ones you can wear across your body.


Large breasts
Don't wear the wrong size bra and spill out.


Don't wear tops with ruffles or pastel shades, thin spaghetti straps, delicate camisole tops or complicated necklines.


Don't wear bulky tops, necklines that are too revealing, tops in spangly fabrics or sloppy casual tops that cling. Watch out for 'pulling' on shirts.


Do wear subtle v-neck tops that hint at cleavage, dark colours in matt fabrics on your top half, and tailored shirts.


Wear wide-leg, bootleg trousers or fuller skirts to balance your heavier top half. Try scoop necklines in plain fabrics.


Small breasts
Don't assume any bra with padding will work. It must fit so the seams and padding can't be seen.


Don't not wear a bra under flimsy fabrics.


Do wear jewellery such as chokers that detract from a flat chest and balance your outfit; halterneck tops give shoulder width.


Do wear pretty tops or dresses with spaghetti straps. Other good choices include curvy jackets nipped in at the waist, tops in lighter fabric than your bottom half, coat dresses and ballet-style cardigans.


Large hips/thighs
Don't wear bias cut skirts or dresses that cling, narrow-leg trousers or jeans, flat shoes, any kind of cropped top or tapered knee-length skirts.


Don't wear cargo pants or combats with side pockets, jackets or coats with belts that will flare out over your hips, belts that cinch the waist.


Do wear bootleg or flare-cut dark denim stretch for a relaxed line over curves. Combine with heels, low-slung belts and fine-knit cardigans with just the top button done up.


Do wear close-fitting denim skirts to below the knee with split, baggy cotton or parachute trousers, and knee-length jackets with structured shoulders that will balance out a heavier bottom half. Take out pockets in trousers or sew them down.


Big bottom
Don't wear light colours below your waist. Also avoid narrow legs, shiny fabric, leather trousers or thin heels.


Don't wear oversized, baggy or men's trousers, jeans with detailing and pockets, short skirts, anything half a size too small or bias-cut dresses that hug the bum.


Do wear looser fitting, lower slung trousers that skim, longer length jackets that end below your bottom in a single breasted simple shape, and open-toe shoes.


Do wear dark colours on your bottom half. Jeans in dark denim stretch will minimise baggy waist problems, or try trousers with no back pockets and pinstripe trousers. Try tying a thin knit cardigan round your waist for casual camouflage.


Large tummy
Don't wear skirts or dresses in flimsy fabrics that offer no support, drawstring waist trousers or low-cut hipsters, elastic waist tops, big prints or tiny floral prints.


Don't wear support knickers that are too small or tops that contain lycra - they just emphasise spare tyres. Don't wear tops designed to be tucked in.


Do wear denim skirts with a zip or buttons at the front - the fabric really holds your stomach in.


Do wear shirts or cardigans with buttons, leaving the last three or four unbuttoned to skim over tummy. Wear longer length jackets, trousers that zip at the side and flat-fronted skirts.


Do wear big chunky belts slung around the lower stomach, long and lean stretch jeans to elongate your body and slightly low-slung waistbands.


Plump legs/ankles
Don't wear mid-length skirts that end at your calves, short mini skirts, calf-length or ankle boots, light coloured or shiny tights. Don't let your hem fall at the fattest part of your leg.


Don't wear very delicate strappy shoes, ankle straps or ankle chains. Don't wear heels above 2.5 inches if you are a size 4 or under - you'll just look off balance.


Do wear wedges, low-cut shoes, black knee-length boots in suede or stretch fabric (if they won't do up around calves). Skirts that end just below the knee make lower legs look longer.


Do wear sandals with broader straps across the foot to disguise puffy ankles. Wear dark coloured plain tights or fake tan.


This article was last medically reviewed by Dr Rob Hicks in October 2005.
First published in May 2001.
*BBC.co.uk Health
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Postby kate_turner2000 » Thu Mar 22, 2007 10:38 am

Saturday 24th March

TIP #61 STYLE TIPS FOR MEN


Short
Don't wear shoes with built-in heels, or high cowboy boots - they don't make you look taller.


Don't wear your trousers too short or add massive turn-ups.


Do wear sleeves and trousers, as long as you can without them looking swamped - it can add an extra inch.


Do go for vertical patterns, stripes, single-breasted jackets, straight-leg trousers or jeans, and narrow ties.


Tall
Don't wear jackets done right up, avoid zips down the front, and avoid wearing the same colour head to toe.


Don't wear pinstripe suits, vertical patterns, jackets that end at the waist or very thin ties.


Do think about longer jackets, double-breasted suits and trousers with a low waist.


Do try lower cut trendy jeans in dark denim and layering different length tops and jackets.


Bulky
Don't wear tops or jackets with extra padding or loud ties and avoid doing shirts right up.


Buy the correct neck size for formal shirts (or half an inch bigger) and never wear a small watch on a thick wrist.


Don't wear bulky jumpers or cable knits and forget about polo neck jumpers. Avoid turn-up trousers or stiff fabric.


Do wear v-necks, jumpers or shirts with a vertical pattern, shirts with narrow or open collars, ties in a single discreet colour, subtle pinstripes and high-buttoned jackets with three or even four buttons.


Do wear tighter lightweight tops in dark colours, fine knitwear that skims rather than swamps the body, and wear easy/relaxed-fit jeans.


Lean
Don't wear v-neck shirts or jumpers and avoid narrow ties.


Don't wear vertical stripes, pinstripe suits, shiny fabrics or very tight fitting tops that hug your shoulders tightly.


Do wear padding in jackets and waistcoats over T-shirts, check suits and double-breasted jackets.


Do wear baggy low-slung combat trousers, cargo pants with pockets on the sides, horizontal details on tops, bulky knit sweaters and polo necks. Button shirts up to the max.


Large stomach
Don't wear waistcoats or anything too small that will strain across a larger stomach. Don't wear man-made fibres that cling to a bulge and go static.


Avoid wearing trousers over your stomach. Avoid double-breasted jackets or suits, shiny fabrics or lighter colours.


Do wear loose-fitting clothes - darker shades in cotton or linen. Buy trousers big enough to do up on the stomach, and make sure ties are wide and end on your waistband.


Do wear a jacket and trousers in the same colour; go for single-breasted jackets every time.


Big bottom
Don't wear trousers in camel, white and bleached denim; avoid jeans with fussy details.


Don't wear trousers in shiny fabrics or low-cut trousers that reveal any hint of a builder's bum when you bend over.


Do wear dark colours on the bottom half, including dark denim jeans or chino-style trousers.


Do wear trousers in plain and matt fabrics, plain jeans with minimal detailing and loose or baggy fit jeans without the underwear poking out.


Hair styles for different face shapes
Round: Avoid a square haircut - leave hair longer on top and full at the sides and stick to medium-length sideburns.


Long: Widen and shorten the forehead by going short and close at the ears and on top of the head. Avoid puffy styles and add volume at the sides, not the top, and opt for a side parting.


Heart-shaped: Go flat at the sides and ruffled on top. Keep hair around the sides of the face as straight as possible and grow some stubble to balance out the face.


Oval: Lucky you - you can go for a variety of shapes, so enjoy!


This article was last medically reviewed by Dr Rob Hicks in October 2005.
First published in May 2001.


*BBC.co.uk Health
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Postby kate_turner2000 » Sun Mar 25, 2007 9:49 pm

Sunday 25th March

TIP #62 DESSERT

use a teaspoon to measure out your dessert and use it to consume it as well. it means you can enjoy each spoon full and it lasts longer!
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Postby zeedeveelgirl » Sun Mar 25, 2007 10:03 pm

That's a great tip, Kate!! I always use the smallest spoon I can find if I'm eating a dessert or even a particularly yummy yoghurt that I really want to savour... (The new Nestle Blissfull Caramel Pear is BEAUTIFUL!!!)
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