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Dave's Food Diary

Share and keep track of what you eat each day to help you lose weight.

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Re: Dave's Food Diary

Postby laughing_sheep » Sat Dec 18, 2010 9:59 am

Hey Dave, I saw counsellors/psychiatrists too on and off for about five years all up and they didn't really help. Recently I went for a couple of Reiki sessions (I mention Reiki because I know you're interested in alternative therapies), and the first time I went during that hour I had all of these painful memories come up, even ones that I'd completely forgotten about. I was sick for four days afterward.

I didn't want to to go back but mum convinced me and said that sometimes in order to get better you have to feel a bit bad at first, like a dirty pan that needs washing at first its going to look bad when cleaning but eventually it clears.

Well it was very different the second time and it went very quickly (felt like 5 minutes instead of an hour) and I felt intense heat which was strange. My mum told me that Reiki works using the positive energy in the universe.

Well yesterday I did a huge clean out of my room...just because I felt like it. My whole entire life I've had a messy room and I have never ever voluntarily cleaned it out. Also I'm feeling alot happier and I've stopped taking the anti-depressant I was on, I don't feel like it I need it anymore.

To me the first Reiki session was the equivalent of five years worth of counselling in one hour and I can feel the difference in my mood and behaviours now. I mention this because it might help you, you never know...
~Steph~

Starting weight: 92
Current weight: 70
Goal weight: 66
laughing_sheep
 
Posts: 230
Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2010 8:19 pm

Re: Dave's Food Diary

Postby Dave » Sat Dec 18, 2010 8:11 pm

Firstly, I’d like to apologise to Dragon fly, who simply asked a simple question to which I gave a complex answer. I have to stop doing that! It’s something I am working on ... :)
Thanks for sharing that with me Steph. It’s very refreshing to hear others open up with such honesty! Indeed I am open to alternative methods and having done a quick search on Reiki, I’m pleased to say it bodes well with me. I’ll look further into when I’m not tethering off my Iphone.
It’s early days with the therapist, yet we are making ground. He seems somewhat different than many others I have crossed paths with. He appears to respect my Radical ways and as ironically as I have found many professionals; lest reactive than others...LOL
I believe he may be sick of dealing with others he pumps full of medicine that come back continually with the same problems...of course that’s only an assumption...but I can tell he likes giving advice other than pills and seemingly enjoys haring about my progress as I do his encouragements.
I can’t remember if already mentioned, but I only just saw him today with my wife. It went really well. I have been cleared of Depression and just have to work on my Anxiety. I am really happy about this progress. It’s very rewarding having put in so much time and effort to live the lifestyle I now do. Despite my radical ways, I am very much the same as everyone else and today have had a blowout myself...but the way I tend to look at these things now is as you say or mention...Positive “Energy”... My body needs the rest and the food...regardless of all the minute measurements and so forth...my energy feels good all the same : )
I’m really happy that Reiki has worked so well for you Steph...it pays not to be set in stone! In this way I am able to blend and glean what I need from whatever approach I make use of.
Take care guys...hopefully I won’t have to tether off my phone much longer and the line will be fixed “roles eyes”
"Action may not always bring happiness, but there is no happiness without action"
.................. Image...............
Dave
 
Posts: 596
Joined: Mon Jul 09, 2007 8:37 am
Location: QLD Toowoomba

Re: Dave's Food Diary

Postby dragonfly » Mon Dec 20, 2010 10:55 pm

its ok dave, the thought did cross my mind about wow, information overload LOL, but I do like reading each little peace of your mind, I feel connected to you somehow, and get to know you some more each time you post. I am sure if we lived closer we'd probably hang out and go check out each others gardens LOL food swap, as I picked 6 cucumbers tonight.... could really do with a veggies garden swap buddy lol.
karin
mum of 5
loosing by eating low fat, natural, organic and fresh

heaviest weight: 189kg
goal weight: 89kg
currently: 143.5kg
TOTAL LOST: 45.5kg
dragonfly
 
Posts: 321
Joined: Tue Dec 20, 2005 10:40 pm

Re: Dave's Food Diary

Postby laughing_sheep » Tue Dec 21, 2010 9:12 pm

Dave wrote:Firstly, I’d like to apologise to Dragon fly, who simply asked a simple question to which I gave a complex answer. I have to stop doing that! It’s something I am working on ... :)
Thanks for sharing that with me Steph. It’s very refreshing to hear others open up with such honesty! Indeed I am open to alternative methods and having done a quick search on Reiki, I’m pleased to say it bodes well with me. I’ll look further into when I’m not tethering off my Iphone.
It’s early days with the therapist, yet we are making ground. He seems somewhat different than many others I have crossed paths with. He appears to respect my Radical ways and as ironically as I have found many professionals; lest reactive than others...LOL
I believe he may be sick of dealing with others he pumps full of medicine that come back continually with the same problems...of course that’s only an assumption...but I can tell he likes giving advice other than pills and seemingly enjoys haring about my progress as I do his encouragements.
I can’t remember if already mentioned, but I only just saw him today with my wife. It went really well. I have been cleared of Depression and just have to work on my Anxiety. I am really happy about this progress. It’s very rewarding having put in so much time and effort to live the lifestyle I now do. Despite my radical ways, I am very much the same as everyone else and today have had a blowout myself...but the way I tend to look at these things now is as you say or mention...Positive “Energy”... My body needs the rest and the food...regardless of all the minute measurements and so forth...my energy feels good all the same : )
I’m really happy that Reiki has worked so well for you Steph...it pays not to be set in stone! In this way I am able to blend and glean what I need from whatever approach I make use of.
Take care guys...hopefully I won’t have to tether off my phone much longer and the line will be fixed “roles eyes”


I think that what you say is interesting too Dave, I think we're all here for the same reasons and alot of use have the same emotional issues so I relate to alot of what you're saying. I had a shrink who use to constantly pump me full of medication and it was awful, I felt like I was being controlled by pills! However I'm glad that your shrink is helping you, and if it works for you then go for it of course.
~Steph~

Starting weight: 92
Current weight: 70
Goal weight: 66
laughing_sheep
 
Posts: 230
Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2010 8:19 pm

Re: Dave's Food Diary

Postby Dave » Wed Dec 22, 2010 8:14 pm

Hi guys, my internet is back up. If only...dragonfly...I've got like 600 potatoes to harvest. Here is a garden update about my potatoes I uploaded to youtube:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UublaeySaBw
Image
These sweet bite tomatoes below are absolutely heavenly to burst in your mouth!
Image
These large Tomatoes are probably some of the best quality I have grown. I sun them for about a day on my window sill and they actually melt in you mouth with every chew. I only hit them with soluble potash like twice and maybe some worm wee once...I only cut the black spot, moldy leaves overgrowth plus suckers like twice...essentially after that, I simply let them go mad with all the rain we have had of late.
Image
These Asian Beans have been interesting to grow...A good Cambodian friend passed them over to me. I did not think much at first as I was only given 3 to which on was damaged. Seems to look promising given only 3 plants. Once again, I have not done much to our rich soil here. I'm impressed.
Image
Here are some peppers also in good nick. I'll bite into the red one tomorrow :D
Image
I'll show you the carrots and beets later...they are getting a bit on now and if you guys were close by, I'd drop off a vegie box for sure. I've been supplying the neighbors as it is. My silverbeat has been very handy to have! Apoologies on the low sound with my camera...you'll have to turn your sound up to max if your viewing the update on Youtube. Overall, I have to admit that I have let me garden go somewhat. I have kept a show quality veggie patch previous to this. I pride myself on no chemicals or should I say as organic as possible and so forth. I also like companion planting as well as color and design layouts. This latest garden was a throw together project to assist me with my "recovery" The garden indeed has been a tremendous help with respect to my well being over all. I really wish I could find someone like minded to help with successive cropping and maintenance. The potential for long term healthy eating would be a gold mine in itself. I am thinking of putting an add in the paper or actively searching to put up such an offer for someone who may have the time.

Thanks also Steph...I'd pass over whatever I could to you as well. I hope you are all prepared for the coming weekend. Keep those portion sizes down. I'll be relaxing my food choices yet simply choosing the healthiest of what options are available...plenty of salad of all the sugar and no alcohol for me. Whatever way you guys go...please just have fun. I am a very quiet guy when not showing off to my online friends...but like I said in my video to my other forum buddies...I'll also be thinking of my weightloss friends here as well. Take care guys and nice to catch up with you all :wink:
"Action may not always bring happiness, but there is no happiness without action"
.................. Image...............
Dave
 
Posts: 596
Joined: Mon Jul 09, 2007 8:37 am
Location: QLD Toowoomba

Re: Dave's Food Diary

Postby Dave » Thu Dec 23, 2010 9:16 am

THE TRUTH ABOUT DIARY:
OK...lets sink our teeth into this :D ...below is my half baked attempt to summarize a link that I whole heatedly agree with...then I got tired & my wife came to the rescue...in time I will reveal the truth about this widely misunderstood product that had been fed to us all as a quick fix and money spinner! NOTE * I still have yogurt...there is more potential for benefit with the activity of enzymes in it with the culturing process...yet others could debate on other issues with that....at the end of the day...I'm just going to spell out the WARNINGS first...then we can dive into the variables later. This is something I've wanted to get my head around for ages as my wife is vigilant about avoiding diary whenever we can...no I can share WHY.

“The Truth about Milk and Dairy Products”
http://www.squidoo.com/truth-about-milk-and-dairy
Here’s my summery to the above site:
MMM...mmmmm Dairy, don’t ya just love that full feeling...quick and easy, but wait till you hear why it makes you feel full:
Simply put Cow’s milk is for Baby Cows, not Humans. Although widely used on human babies over the course of history (domesticated history) there are some biological facts you should be aware that are NOT advertised...as the consequences of Quick and Easy never are!
Milk contains the protein “casein” which is chemically bound to the calcium in milk. In order to break this bond our bodies digestive system uses the enzymes (Renin and Lactase). Here’s the thing ... As adults our bodies no longer produce those enzymes; we stopped making them after about the age of 3 and 4! Regardless of lactose intolerant...we simply don’t break down milk effectively to begin with...hence that full feeling you mistake as so satisfying...just another think clogging up your system! OH YEA..."casein" is used to make one of the worlds strongest wood glues :lol:
But hang on...milk is healthy isn’t it? It’s our main source of calcium, great for all the bone and all that...right?????
You can refer to the link above for more insight into that, but I’m going to source a chapter my wife has just landed on the table in front of me. It comes from a Book that set the path to our healthy eating habits just as Dr Judith Orloff has helped me with my emotions:

I will need time to quote it out is all. I assure you I do this for the benefit of us all...I really don’t like debates ; )
BOOK:
NOURISHING TRADITION
(The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats)
Revised Second Edition
Sally Fallon
with Mary G. Enig, Ph.D.

Extract coming later in the day or evening.

ALSO before I leave.....here is yet another COLD STONE look at diary...I've only just skimmed it...but it looks like the hard ass kind of truth I can respect...my wife suffers Multiple sclerosis (MS) and the fact she loves dairy has really upset her that it has cause her so much damage!!! I'm upset at how those in control continue to justify feeding the nation as such, yet we live in an overpopulated world in an imperfect system that requires that we educate ourselves!!! So lets just do that :wink:
http://www.rense.com/general26/milk.htm
PS.........................sorry.......just another note* For all the "preaching" I don't want to do, I don't wish to appear naive in my posts...to which I admit a crop of Potato's is rather debatable in the scheme of things considering they are also considered a poisonous food crop...more on that later...it really does come down to knowing your biology and balancing it all out and in some cases having to go without, what others may be able to digest...however in the case of milk...its pretty much bad all round :shock:
"Action may not always bring happiness, but there is no happiness without action"
.................. Image...............
Dave
 
Posts: 596
Joined: Mon Jul 09, 2007 8:37 am
Location: QLD Toowoomba

Re: Dave's Food Diary

Postby Dave » Thu Dec 23, 2010 3:21 pm

OK...as promised:
First I must note...my wife and I are not into depriving ourselves by being so hardcore on our food choices. We still struggle to choose the right foods due to the addictive properties just like everyone else out there. I myself have given in many times. For those that know me, will have heard me say many times now that my wife sufferer from a debilitating illness, MS "Multiple Sclerosis", which effects her nervous system and much more I am yet to research...I myself have had my gall bladder removed as many millions of others which has changed they way my body digestive system works and places quite a load on my liver to which in turn is also related skin issues...so on and so forth. We are not getting any younger and the food choices are getting more and more complex...What I am getting at, is that where not just some hippy couple that will willy nilly go along with whatever...we take great care in sourcing our information & despite being somewhat overly careful we still remain open to the reality of eating in today's world...we simply strive to make the best decisions knowing exactly how the different food groups effect our bodies with relation to the way foods are now proceed and additives used. We are only new to this lifestyle and already have seem some amazing results. Now I share some with you some important information that the Dairy companies and those that profit off them go to great lengths to ensure you are not educated on the following:

BOOK:
NOURISHING TRADITION
(The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats)
Revised Second Edition
Sally Fallon
with Mary G. Enig, Ph.D.

MILK & MILK PRODUCTS

What about milk? Among nutritionists, there is no other subject that arouses so much controversy—even animosity—as the debate on milk consumption. While our hunter-gatherer ancestors did not use milk products, there are many healthy nomadic and agricultural societies, dating back as far as 9,000 years that depend on milk of cattle, sheep, goats, horses, water buffalo and camels for their animal protein and fat, and value this “white blood” for its life-sustaining properties. Just a few decades ago, Americans accepted without question the premise that milk was good for us and that a safe, plentiful supply was actually vital to our national security. Today milk consumption is blamed for everything from chronic ear infections in children to cancer and diabetes in adults.

Some people have a low tolerance to milk because they lack intestinal lactase, an enzyme that digests lactose, or milk sugar. All baby mammals produce lactase but production of the enzyme declines and may even disappear after weaning. In humans, a mutation or recessive gene allows the continued production of lactase in some individuals. In an isolated population that depends on milk products for animal protein, those with this gene would have an advantage. If a gene for the persistence of lactase had a frequency of 5 percent in such a population, in 400 generations its frequency would have risen to 60 percent assuming that those who possessed it had 1 percent more children per generation than intolerant individuals. Natural selection is the mechanism for adapting isolated populations to the food available to them. But modern man is highly peripatetic, and no society in the western world is composed entirely of people whose ancestors come from the immediate region.

By some estimates, only 30-40 percent of the world’s population produces lactase in adulthood. Overuse of antibiotics also contributes to lactose intolerance. However, most lactose intolerant individuals can consume milk products in small quantities without problems. Asians are said to be lactose intolerant but many of the inhabitants of Japan and China drink milk and eat milk products like cheese, yogurt and ice cream when they can obtain them.

In addition, some people are allergic to a milk protein called casein, which is one of the most difficult proteins for the body to digest. Once again, the process of natural selection will result in a population more able to digest casein if milk and milk products are part of the traditional diet.

The practice of fermenting or souring milk is found in almost all traditional groups that keep herds. This process partially breaks down lactose and predigests casein. The end products, such as yoghurt, kefir and clabber, are often well tolerated by adults who cannot drink fresh milk. Butter and cream contain little lactose or casein and are usually well tolerated in their natural state, even by those who are lactose intolerant. Even so, fermented or soured butter and cream are more digestible. Those with an extreme intolerance for milk protein can take butter in the form of ghee or clarified butter from which the milk solids have been removed. Cheese, which consists of highly concentrated casein, is well tolerated by some and best completely avoided by others. Cheeses made from raw milk contain a full complement of enzymes and are therefore more easily digested than cheeses made from pasteurized milk. Natural cheeses, whether from pasteurized or unpasteurized milk, will be more digestible when eaten unheated. Processed cheeses contain emulsifiers, extenders, phosphates and hydrogenated oils; they should be strictly avoided.

While some lucky people are genetically equipped to digest milk in all its forms, the milk sold in your supermarket is bad for everybody, partly because the modern cow is a freak of nature. A century ago cows produced two or three gallons per day; today’s Holsteins routinely give three four times as much. This is accomplished by selective breeding to produce cows with abnormally active pituitary glands and by high-protein feeding. The pituitary gland not only produces hormone that stimulate the production of milk, it also produces growth hormones. Recently the FDA approved a genetically engineered growth hormone for cows. These hormones are identical to those produced by the pituitary gland in today’s high-production cows. This practice will simply add to the high level of bovine growth hormones that have been present in our milk for decades. These hormones are present in the water fraction of the milk, not in the butterfat. Babies receive growth hormones from their mothers through their mothers’ milk. Small amounts of these hormones are necessary and moderate amounts are not harmful, but a superfluity can result in growth abnormalities. Excessive pituitary hormones are also associated with tumour formation, and some studies link milk consumption with cancer. The freak-pituitary cow is prone to many diseases. She almost always secretes pus into her milk and needs frequent doses of antibiotics.

Another serious problem with today’s dairying methods is the feeding of high-protein soybean meal to the cows. This stimulates them to produce large quantities of milk but contributes to a high rate of mastitis and other problems that lead to sterility, liver problems and shortened lives. Little research has been done to determine what these soy feeds do to the kind and quality of protein in cow’s milk. Is the current high rate of milk-protein allergies due to the use of inappropriate fee in our dairy herds? The proper food for cows is green plants, especially the rapidly growing green grasses in the early spring and fall. Milk from properly fed cows will contain the Price Factor and cancer-fighting CLA as well as a rich supply of vitamins and minerals. Unfortunately, under the current system, farmers have little incentive to pasture-feed their herds nor to follow other practices that result in high quality milk.

Another factor contributing to the degradation of today’s milk is pasteurization. We have been taught that pasteurization is beneficial; a method of protecting ourselves against infectious disease but closer examination reveals that its merits have been highly exaggerated. The modern milking machine and stainless steel tank, along with efficient packaging and distribution, make pasteurization totally unnecessary for the purposes of sanitation. And pasteurization is no guarantee of cleanliness. All outbreaks of salmonella from contaminated milk in recent decades—and there have been many—have occurred in pasteurized milk. This includes a 1985 outbreak in Illinois that struck over 14,000 people causing at least one death. The salmonella strain in that batch of pasteurized milk was found to be genetically resistant to both penicillin and tetracycline. Raw milk contains lactic-acid-producing bacteria that protect against pathogens. Pasteurization destroys these helpful organisms; leaving the finished product devoid of any protective mechanism should undesirable bacteria inadvertently contaminate the supply. Raw milk in time turns pleasantly sour, while pasteurized milk, lacking beneficial bacteria, will putrefy.

But that’s not all that pasteurization does to milk. Heat alters milk’s amino acids lysine and tyrosine, making the whole complex of proteins less available; it promotes rancidity of unsaturated fatty acids and destruction of vitamins. Vitamin C loss in pasteurization usually exceeds 50 percent loss of other water-soluble vitamins can run as high as 80 percent; the Wulzen or anti-stiffness factor is totally destroyed as is vitamin B12, needed for healthy blood and a properly functioning nervous system. Pasteurization reduces the availability of milk’s mineral components, such as calcium, chloride, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, sodium and sulphur, as well as many trace minerals. There is some evidence that pasteurization alters lactose, making it more readily absorbable. This, and the fact that pasteurized milk puts an unnecessary strain on the pancreas to produce digestive enzymes, may explain why milk consumption in civilized societies has been linked with diabetes.

Last but not least, pasteurization destroys all the enzymes in milk—in fact, the test for successful pasteurization is absence of enzymes. These enzymes help the body assimilate all bodybuilding factors, including calcium. That is why those who drink pasteurized milk may suffer from osteoporosis. Lipase in raw milk helps the body digest and utilize butterfat.
After pasteurization, chemicals may be added to suppress odour and restore taste. Synthetic Vitamin D2 or D3 is added—the former is toxic and has been linked to heart diseases while the latter is difficult to absorb. The final indignity is homogenization, which has also been linked to heart disease.

Powdered skim milk is added to the most popular varieties of commercial milk—one-percent and two-percent milk. Commercial dehydration methods oxidize cholesterol in powdered milk, rendering it harmful to the arteries. High temperature drying also creates large quantities of cross-linked proteins and nitrate compounds, which are potent carcinogens, as well as free glutamic acid which is toxic to the nervous system.
Modern pasteurized milk, devoid of its enzyme content, puts an enormous strain on the body’s digestive mechanism. In the elderly, and those with milk intolerance or inherited weaknesses of digestion, this milk passes through not fully digested and can build up around the tiny villi of the small intestine, preventing the absorption of vital nutrients and promoting the uptake of toxic substances.’ The result is allergies, chronic fatigue and a host of degenerative diseases.

All the healthy milk-drinking populations studied by Dr. Price consumed raw milk, raw cultured milk or raw cheese from normal healthy animals eating fresh grass or fodder. It is very difficult to find this kind of milk in America. In California, New Mexico and Connecticut, raw milk is available in health food stores, although such milk often comes from cows raised in confinement.
In many states you can buy raw milk at the farm. If you can find a farmer who will sell you raw milk from old-fashioned Jersey or Guernsey cows (or from goats) tested free of tuberculosis and brucellosis and allowed to feed on fresh pasturage, then by all means avail yourself of this source.

Some stores now carry pasteurized but not homogenized milk from cows raised on natural feed. Such milk may be used to make cultured milk products such as kefir, yoghurt, cultured buttermilk and cultured cream. Traditionally cultured buttermilk, which is low in casein but high in lactic acid, is often well tolerated by those with milk allergies and gives excellent results when used to soak whole grain flours for baking. If you cannot find good quality raw milk, you should limit your consumption of milk products to cultured milk, cultured buttermilk, whole milk yogurt, butter,cream, and raw cheeses—all of which are available in all states. Much imported cheese is raw— look for the words “milk” or “fresh milk” on the label—and of very high quality.
For butter from pasture-fed cows and organic ghee by mail order, see Sources. See also http://www.Realmilk.com for a listing of raw milk and milk products from pasture-fed animals.
"Action may not always bring happiness, but there is no happiness without action"
.................. Image...............
Dave
 
Posts: 596
Joined: Mon Jul 09, 2007 8:37 am
Location: QLD Toowoomba

Re: Dave's Food Diary

Postby Dave » Sun Dec 26, 2010 4:43 pm

Did Well......................kept the portions sized to medium...NO SUGAR whats so ever....No Alcohol..........plenty of water and now two rest days before hitting it again.
Probably better than most people so I'm happy with that!
Looking forward to getting back into things tomorrow.
"Action may not always bring happiness, but there is no happiness without action"
.................. Image...............
Dave
 
Posts: 596
Joined: Mon Jul 09, 2007 8:37 am
Location: QLD Toowoomba

Re: Dave's Food Diary

Postby laughing_sheep » Mon Dec 27, 2010 8:58 am

Dave wrote:OK...as promised:
First I must note...my wife and I are not into depriving ourselves by being so hardcore on our food choices. We still struggle to choose the right foods due to the addictive properties just like everyone else out there. I myself have given in many times. For those that know me, will have heard me say many times now that my wife sufferer from a debilitating illness, MS "Multiple Sclerosis", which effects her nervous system and much more I am yet to research...I myself have had my gall bladder removed as many millions of others which has changed they way my body digestive system works and places quite a load on my liver to which in turn is also related skin issues...so on and so forth. We are not getting any younger and the food choices are getting more and more complex...What I am getting at, is that where not just some hippy couple that will willy nilly go along with whatever...we take great care in sourcing our information & despite being somewhat overly careful we still remain open to the reality of eating in today's world...we simply strive to make the best decisions knowing exactly how the different food groups effect our bodies with relation to the way foods are now proceed and additives used. We are only new to this lifestyle and already have seem some amazing results. Now I share some with you some important information that the Dairy companies and those that profit off them go to great lengths to ensure you are not educated on the following:

BOOK:
NOURISHING TRADITION
(The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats)
Revised Second Edition
Sally Fallon
with Mary G. Enig, Ph.D.

MILK & MILK PRODUCTS

What about milk? Among nutritionists, there is no other subject that arouses so much controversy—even animosity—as the debate on milk consumption. While our hunter-gatherer ancestors did not use milk products, there are many healthy nomadic and agricultural societies, dating back as far as 9,000 years that depend on milk of cattle, sheep, goats, horses, water buffalo and camels for their animal protein and fat, and value this “white blood” for its life-sustaining properties. Just a few decades ago, Americans accepted without question the premise that milk was good for us and that a safe, plentiful supply was actually vital to our national security. Today milk consumption is blamed for everything from chronic ear infections in children to cancer and diabetes in adults.

Some people have a low tolerance to milk because they lack intestinal lactase, an enzyme that digests lactose, or milk sugar. All baby mammals produce lactase but production of the enzyme declines and may even disappear after weaning. In humans, a mutation or recessive gene allows the continued production of lactase in some individuals. In an isolated population that depends on milk products for animal protein, those with this gene would have an advantage. If a gene for the persistence of lactase had a frequency of 5 percent in such a population, in 400 generations its frequency would have risen to 60 percent assuming that those who possessed it had 1 percent more children per generation than intolerant individuals. Natural selection is the mechanism for adapting isolated populations to the food available to them. But modern man is highly peripatetic, and no society in the western world is composed entirely of people whose ancestors come from the immediate region.

By some estimates, only 30-40 percent of the world’s population produces lactase in adulthood. Overuse of antibiotics also contributes to lactose intolerance. However, most lactose intolerant individuals can consume milk products in small quantities without problems. Asians are said to be lactose intolerant but many of the inhabitants of Japan and China drink milk and eat milk products like cheese, yogurt and ice cream when they can obtain them.

In addition, some people are allergic to a milk protein called casein, which is one of the most difficult proteins for the body to digest. Once again, the process of natural selection will result in a population more able to digest casein if milk and milk products are part of the traditional diet.

The practice of fermenting or souring milk is found in almost all traditional groups that keep herds. This process partially breaks down lactose and predigests casein. The end products, such as yoghurt, kefir and clabber, are often well tolerated by adults who cannot drink fresh milk. Butter and cream contain little lactose or casein and are usually well tolerated in their natural state, even by those who are lactose intolerant. Even so, fermented or soured butter and cream are more digestible. Those with an extreme intolerance for milk protein can take butter in the form of ghee or clarified butter from which the milk solids have been removed. Cheese, which consists of highly concentrated casein, is well tolerated by some and best completely avoided by others. Cheeses made from raw milk contain a full complement of enzymes and are therefore more easily digested than cheeses made from pasteurized milk. Natural cheeses, whether from pasteurized or unpasteurized milk, will be more digestible when eaten unheated. Processed cheeses contain emulsifiers, extenders, phosphates and hydrogenated oils; they should be strictly avoided.

While some lucky people are genetically equipped to digest milk in all its forms, the milk sold in your supermarket is bad for everybody, partly because the modern cow is a freak of nature. A century ago cows produced two or three gallons per day; today’s Holsteins routinely give three four times as much. This is accomplished by selective breeding to produce cows with abnormally active pituitary glands and by high-protein feeding. The pituitary gland not only produces hormone that stimulate the production of milk, it also produces growth hormones. Recently the FDA approved a genetically engineered growth hormone for cows. These hormones are identical to those produced by the pituitary gland in today’s high-production cows. This practice will simply add to the high level of bovine growth hormones that have been present in our milk for decades. These hormones are present in the water fraction of the milk, not in the butterfat. Babies receive growth hormones from their mothers through their mothers’ milk. Small amounts of these hormones are necessary and moderate amounts are not harmful, but a superfluity can result in growth abnormalities. Excessive pituitary hormones are also associated with tumour formation, and some studies link milk consumption with cancer. The freak-pituitary cow is prone to many diseases. She almost always secretes pus into her milk and needs frequent doses of antibiotics.

Another serious problem with today’s dairying methods is the feeding of high-protein soybean meal to the cows. This stimulates them to produce large quantities of milk but contributes to a high rate of mastitis and other problems that lead to sterility, liver problems and shortened lives. Little research has been done to determine what these soy feeds do to the kind and quality of protein in cow’s milk. Is the current high rate of milk-protein allergies due to the use of inappropriate fee in our dairy herds? The proper food for cows is green plants, especially the rapidly growing green grasses in the early spring and fall. Milk from properly fed cows will contain the Price Factor and cancer-fighting CLA as well as a rich supply of vitamins and minerals. Unfortunately, under the current system, farmers have little incentive to pasture-feed their herds nor to follow other practices that result in high quality milk.

Another factor contributing to the degradation of today’s milk is pasteurization. We have been taught that pasteurization is beneficial; a method of protecting ourselves against infectious disease but closer examination reveals that its merits have been highly exaggerated. The modern milking machine and stainless steel tank, along with efficient packaging and distribution, make pasteurization totally unnecessary for the purposes of sanitation. And pasteurization is no guarantee of cleanliness. All outbreaks of salmonella from contaminated milk in recent decades—and there have been many—have occurred in pasteurized milk. This includes a 1985 outbreak in Illinois that struck over 14,000 people causing at least one death. The salmonella strain in that batch of pasteurized milk was found to be genetically resistant to both penicillin and tetracycline. Raw milk contains lactic-acid-producing bacteria that protect against pathogens. Pasteurization destroys these helpful organisms; leaving the finished product devoid of any protective mechanism should undesirable bacteria inadvertently contaminate the supply. Raw milk in time turns pleasantly sour, while pasteurized milk, lacking beneficial bacteria, will putrefy.

But that’s not all that pasteurization does to milk. Heat alters milk’s amino acids lysine and tyrosine, making the whole complex of proteins less available; it promotes rancidity of unsaturated fatty acids and destruction of vitamins. Vitamin C loss in pasteurization usually exceeds 50 percent loss of other water-soluble vitamins can run as high as 80 percent; the Wulzen or anti-stiffness factor is totally destroyed as is vitamin B12, needed for healthy blood and a properly functioning nervous system. Pasteurization reduces the availability of milk’s mineral components, such as calcium, chloride, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, sodium and sulphur, as well as many trace minerals. There is some evidence that pasteurization alters lactose, making it more readily absorbable. This, and the fact that pasteurized milk puts an unnecessary strain on the pancreas to produce digestive enzymes, may explain why milk consumption in civilized societies has been linked with diabetes.

Last but not least, pasteurization destroys all the enzymes in milk—in fact, the test for successful pasteurization is absence of enzymes. These enzymes help the body assimilate all bodybuilding factors, including calcium. That is why those who drink pasteurized milk may suffer from osteoporosis. Lipase in raw milk helps the body digest and utilize butterfat.
After pasteurization, chemicals may be added to suppress odour and restore taste. Synthetic Vitamin D2 or D3 is added—the former is toxic and has been linked to heart diseases while the latter is difficult to absorb. The final indignity is homogenization, which has also been linked to heart disease.

Powdered skim milk is added to the most popular varieties of commercial milk—one-percent and two-percent milk. Commercial dehydration methods oxidize cholesterol in powdered milk, rendering it harmful to the arteries. High temperature drying also creates large quantities of cross-linked proteins and nitrate compounds, which are potent carcinogens, as well as free glutamic acid which is toxic to the nervous system.
Modern pasteurized milk, devoid of its enzyme content, puts an enormous strain on the body’s digestive mechanism. In the elderly, and those with milk intolerance or inherited weaknesses of digestion, this milk passes through not fully digested and can build up around the tiny villi of the small intestine, preventing the absorption of vital nutrients and promoting the uptake of toxic substances.’ The result is allergies, chronic fatigue and a host of degenerative diseases.

All the healthy milk-drinking populations studied by Dr. Price consumed raw milk, raw cultured milk or raw cheese from normal healthy animals eating fresh grass or fodder. It is very difficult to find this kind of milk in America. In California, New Mexico and Connecticut, raw milk is available in health food stores, although such milk often comes from cows raised in confinement.
In many states you can buy raw milk at the farm. If you can find a farmer who will sell you raw milk from old-fashioned Jersey or Guernsey cows (or from goats) tested free of tuberculosis and brucellosis and allowed to feed on fresh pasturage, then by all means avail yourself of this source.

Some stores now carry pasteurized but not homogenized milk from cows raised on natural feed. Such milk may be used to make cultured milk products such as kefir, yoghurt, cultured buttermilk and cultured cream. Traditionally cultured buttermilk, which is low in casein but high in lactic acid, is often well tolerated by those with milk allergies and gives excellent results when used to soak whole grain flours for baking. If you cannot find good quality raw milk, you should limit your consumption of milk products to cultured milk, cultured buttermilk, whole milk yogurt, butter,cream, and raw cheeses—all of which are available in all states. Much imported cheese is raw— look for the words “milk” or “fresh milk” on the label—and of very high quality.
For butter from pasture-fed cows and organic ghee by mail order, see Sources. See also http://www.Realmilk.com for a listing of raw milk and milk products from pasture-fed animals.


Thankyou very much for sharing that Dave, much appreciated. I too have read of dairy being linked to cancer before! Quite alarming. But I have to wonder how much of this is valid for the Australian context as the FDA in the US has had a very bad rep. In country NSW I actually drove past a group of cows who were eating grass and there was a sign at the front that said 'Dairy Farmers Cows' with the Dairy Farmers logo. So I know that these cows are eating grass at least, not sure if cows here in Australia are fed the high-protein soymeal that the ones in the US are. Or are being given a genetically engineered growth hormone- I would understand if cattle bred for meat would be given growth hormones but why would dairy cows be given it especially over time once they have matured into adult cows. I wouldn't be surprised if there are certain US politicians who are in the dairy industries' pockets in America. The information here has definetly given me some food for thought, but I don't think I can give up dairy =)
~Steph~

Starting weight: 92
Current weight: 70
Goal weight: 66
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Re: Dave's Food Diary

Postby Dave » Thu Dec 30, 2010 7:59 am

Hi Steph...The reference to feed is all about minimizing the effects to adult humans. They can be organically fed however the end result still is a negative one, like most foods we now eat :roll: It's all about the constituent of the milk and our inability to break it down...not to mention what they do with it after it comes out the cow! BUT...Minimization done without the "sugar" coating we tend to so often do; is better than giving in to it all. I have a massive weakness at the moment with making our own Yogurt :roll: I JUST CANT STOP MAKING THE STUFF...that will change as I exercise more self control and sweeten my own Natural yogurt instead of flavored packets. At least it's fresh I say....Yea Right...true but still not good enough Dave!!!!!! Back off Buddy!!!!!

Anyways YOUR WELCOME STEPH...I'm only all the more wiser on dairy and now know why we don't eat any other then the Yogurt we make...on the minimizing level there...it's all about digestion! Whatever Dave :roll:

Here is my post and my struggle now.............................I am backing off over the next few days...however it's moments like these that we let ourselves down I guess. Se What happens...my post:

Well, it’s time for some encouraging or perhaps I simply need to encourage myself as is the point of this whole affair. I’m kind of at an exhausting stage...I’ve done well to get to where I’m at, but alas how many times before have my compulsions drive me off the cliff...too many!
I’ve not yet really backed off as I previously once hinted in here...I secretly kept going like someone in the cookie jar. It may appear that I have oodles of time to wallow in, however it would seem that time now beckons for things to be done. There are so many excuses I could come up with really...Despite my exhaustion and things to do...backing off with maintenance in mind still plagues my mind...it’s such a delicate spot that I am sure leads many to BUST!
Oh well...the sun is shining and air fresh...I’ll mow the lawn and take to the chores with new vigour. Perhaps this week I will go easy rather than GIVE UP over how depleted I feel. I simply raise the point of how the strain can bring us undone. Now it’s acknowledged I’ll ease up and mabey use a little herbal salt...GOD FROBID..LOL...
I do have to back of this AWESOME yogurt we have been making...YUM YUM...by far my only weakness!!!!
Time to get some sun...
"Action may not always bring happiness, but there is no happiness without action"
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Re: Dave's Food Diary

Postby Dave » Thu Dec 30, 2010 5:45 pm

Food Additives An Edible Adventure!

Did you see the following an Austar? :
I did try to remain open...but clearly for every E number presented, Google did find the negative aspects and whilst not entirely related to the general population to of been at least impartial, it would of paid dividends to list the allergies, asthma related trouble and so on. Instead a one off placebo test was done on a group of Radical foodest being fed restaurant food without MSG only to have them complain of typical MSG effects. On this one off test alone...it was stated the MSG is safe to consume.

I did watch on after this...however based on that alone, I pretty much dismissed the show as yet another main stream justification that covers up what most don't want to know. Most of the stable food colorings are based on fossil fuels which is rather ridiculous when you consider just how people are led like sheep with regards to thinking their food is fresher because its greener. Society has made itself that way! Fancy having to put copper in your milk to make it appear thicker so that others were rest assured it was quality stuff...Things have not really changed...were just as gullible if not more and instead of hitting the bucket earlier, where living longer but with more hang ups on weather its safe or not!

Simple...don't eat the crap at all and you wont miss it. I'll keep Googling and whilst their is a question mark on it I wont play into it...Next they'll have has eating plastic that's totally digestible as a new method to spread the resources a little more...I can see it now..."Oh we have discovered that the color is not the only important factor to enjoying your meal...it has to have texture as well"...They'll all be lining up for Bright Neon Plastic Hamburgers that taste just like grilled Organic Beef. OH YEA :D
"Action may not always bring happiness, but there is no happiness without action"
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Re: Dave's Food Diary

Postby laughing_sheep » Thu Dec 30, 2010 9:34 pm

I've been tempted to buy a yoghurt maker and make my own yoghurt for a long time now, I guess it must taste alot better than the stuff that's bought ready-made in the shops =)
~Steph~

Starting weight: 92
Current weight: 70
Goal weight: 66
laughing_sheep
 
Posts: 230
Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2010 8:19 pm

Re: Dave's Food Diary

Postby Dave » Fri Dec 31, 2010 2:25 pm

Seriously I know what I'm talking about, ask my uncle Joe. He's been dieting for years:
:lol:Image :lol:
"Action may not always bring happiness, but there is no happiness without action"
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Re: Dave's Food Diary

Postby Dave » Sat Jan 01, 2011 12:30 am

Another YouTube Update on Dave's Veggie Patch...Link Below:
Image
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gG0SOfGBpcs
"Action may not always bring happiness, but there is no happiness without action"
.................. Image...............
Dave
 
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Re: Dave's Food Diary

Postby Dave » Sat Jan 01, 2011 9:21 am

Yet another excellent 10K Run. A PB thus far!!!...almost sub 50min which is a good effort for an old fat fart like me :lol:
http://runkeeper.com/user/Davekyn/activity/21854331

Did some stretching last night in preparation for this mornings run as well as began hydrating. I also drank a glass of water which I am now doing as "soon" as I wake up...even if I crawl back into bed for a little bit! I did some more stretching this morning as well...admittedly I had a two day break which really helped. Back into things today...will do some weights later as well as jump back into the potato patch. This morning I'll be dropping off the first batch of spuds to my mate at the Asian Grocery Store and hopefully my wife wont be in a huge rush so I can have a cup of tea.

Do the shopping come home and watch a downloaded movie before heading into the shed for that weight session and then into the mud for the spuds and SUNSHINE!!!!!...better not rain :twisted: :twisted: :twisted:

HAVE A GOOD YEAR ALL................Best foot forward and all that...many blessings to you all and your family's :D
"Action may not always bring happiness, but there is no happiness without action"
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Dave
 
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