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The Big Deal About Carbs?

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The Big Deal About Carbs?

Postby riotgirl » Wed Nov 25, 2009 12:19 pm

Everyone knows that low or no carb diets result in quick and dramatic weight loss - is it sustainable?
I'd just like to ask if anyone knows if you start to reincorporate carbs into your 4-5 months of low-no carb diet, do you put the weight back on?
I'm not talking about if you go back to eating refined carbs but you know grainy carbs. Hehe... thanks! :D
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Re: The Big Deal About Carbs?

Postby Czarina » Wed Nov 25, 2009 1:01 pm

There is no need to restrict carbs severely to lose weight...it is a pretty pointless exercise because once you incorporate carbs back in, a lot of the weight can be regained.

Check out http://www.calorieking.com.au for an healthy and sustainable way to lose weight.
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Re: The Big Deal About Carbs?

Postby John » Wed Nov 25, 2009 1:35 pm

From my own experience, any gain from carbs is only 1-2 kg, since carbs tend to absorb water in your digestive system. However, I haven't experienced 'quick and dramatic weight loss' with a low carb diet, it really doesn't make that much a difference. The thing I like about a low carb diet is that it is simple. Boring, yes, but simple. For non-foody types like me, it's great.
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Re: The Big Deal About Carbs?

Postby riotgirl » Tue Dec 15, 2009 10:47 am

I am a huge foodie. I love food - and almost every kind too.
I'm just finding it hard not to be hungry when I haven't had enough carbs.
But I think cutting down on carbs would really help drop the weight.
Any thoughts...? :) Thanks again.
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Re: The Big Deal About Carbs?

Postby wannabeslim » Tue Dec 15, 2009 1:42 pm

i think eating more carbs in the morning and then trailing off during the day is a good idea.
carbs are great for energy, which you need all day, but you dont need heaps of carbs to sleep!

try having cereal or high fibre toast for breakfast, a sandwhich for lunch and dinner maybe a third of your meal is carbs.
usually i try to avoid carbs at night cause i get bloated.

i really dont think carbs are responsible for weight gain/loss. its the calories that your consuming!
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Re: The Big Deal About Carbs?

Postby John » Tue Dec 15, 2009 7:16 pm

Although the use of low carbs has is useful for me, the real "driver" of weight loss for me is protein intake. If I consume 100g of protein each day, I'll pretty much guarantee that I'll lose weight that day, low carb or high carb. My problem is that I don't enjoy any protein sources, I guess flavoured tuna is the easiest to eat, but my partner says that it gives me bad breath. That means whey protein powder is next on the list, it's expensive and pretty bland to taste. Consuming 33g of protein (about 40g of whey powder) three times a day is much easier for me than 20g five times a day.

By the way, if you go low carb you'll probably notice a sudden weight loss. It's not fat loss though, just water and digested food.
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Re: The Big Deal About Carbs?

Postby John » Tue Dec 15, 2009 7:26 pm

I forgot to say that one thing I really like about a low carb diet is that I don't get that tiredness feeling that I sometimes get after eating carbs. For someone with health problems like me, that is a huge plus. As for the protein, the reason it's good is it suppresses appetite, in case you didn't know.
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Re: The Big Deal About Carbs?

Postby stevo1 » Tue Jul 06, 2010 12:27 am

Currently there are two dominant schools of thought when it comes to carbohydrate consumption.

On the one hand, we have dietitians and nutritionists telling us for the last 20 years that high carbohydrate low fat diets are best and that carbohydrates don’t make us fat. This view is clearly stated in their promotion of the USDA’s Food Pyramid and in more recent times, The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating.

Both of these food guides provide examples of carbohydrates and recommend them as the main component of our diet. Examples of these carbohydrates include: bread, pasta, rice, cereals and other grain-based food products.

In fact, the USDA Food Pyramid recommends we eat 6-11 serves a day of these examples of carbohydrates in order to have a healthy diet! The advocates of this style of eating are often heard to say things like, ‘The carbohydrates in food doesn’t make you fat, it is what you put on the food that makes you fat.’ They then offer examples like, sour cream on potatoes or butter on bread. Whilst this example may be a contributing factor to society's obesity epidemic, the recommendation to eat the examples of carbohydrates mentioned above is a far stronger factor!

How do low carbohydrate diets work
On the other side of the carbohydrate issue are the advocates of low-carb diets.

Popularised by Dr Robert Atkins in the 70’s (even though their use has been documented for at least 150 years), low-carb eating appears to be experiencing a re-surgence. This is due mainly to the fact that many Hollywood celebrities have confessed to using them to achieve their movie-star bodies.

As a result, the market is being flooded with low-carb diet books and an amazing array of low-carb products, including meal replacement bars, cookies, muffin mixes, cereal products, pizza bases and many others. Often these diets allow an almost unlimited amount of food so long as carbohydrates are restricted and they completely avoid the high carbohydrate low fat diets.

These diametrically opposed views often leave people hopelessly confused about what to eat to achieve maximum weight loss.

In this article I hope to clear up the confusion about carbohydrates in food so you can enjoy your food whilst at the same time lose all the weight and body fat you want.

Insulin and glucagon
In considering the carbohydrates in food and its affect on our body fat stores, we must firstly understand the function of two hormones, insulin and glucagon.

Both of these hormones are produced by the pancreas (an organ that sits behind the stomach) and work in concert to regulate our blood glucose level.

For example, when our blood glucose level rises (after a meal), insulin is the hormone responsible for storing the glucose and normalising the blood glucose level. When the blood glucose level falls, glucagon promotes the release of glucose from the liver, bringing the level back up again.

For fat loss to occur, insulin release must be minimised as much as possible because of the effects it has in the body, which include:

• Promotes the storage of nutrients in cells (positive effect- anabolic).
• Promotes the storage of fat in the adipocytes (fat cells).
• Promotes the uptakes of glucose into the adipocytes and their conversion into fat.
• Increases the activity of fat manufacturing and fat storing and enzymes (lipoprotein lipase - LPL and fatty acid synthase - FAS).
• Inhibits the release of fat from the adipocytes (it stops fat burning).


Insulin is released as a result of mainly two factors and the amount of insulin released is in direct proportion to these two factors.)

• The size of a meal.
• The amount of glucose in the bloodstream.


Accordingly, eating smaller, more frequent meals may help to reduce the insulin response (i.e. eat 5 or 6 small meals a day ).

Also, regulating the amount of glucose entering the bloodstream will help. This may be achieved by:

• Reducing the portion of carbohydrate in each meal.
• Emphasising low Glycaemic Index (GI) carbohydrates.
• Emphasising low-density carbohydrates.
• Ensuring each meal contains a portion of protein, fat and fibre as well as carbohydrate.


Reducing the portion of carbohydrate in each meal
Since insulin is released in response to an increase in blood glucose and fat loss will be maximised if insulin is low, people may be forgiven for thinking that a low-carb diet is the answer.

Whilst this may answer the question: how do low carb diets work? and it is true that these diets do promote fat loss, I do not recommend them for the following reasons:

• They are too hard to sustain long-term.
• They may lead to deficiency diseases due to their avoidance of fruits and vegetables.
• They may negatively affect bodily functions due to a reduced fibre intake and possible high intakes of saturated fat and cholesterol.


Despite the possible negative consequences of low-carb diets, the overall philosophy of reduced insulin response is sound. Therefore, people wanting to lose bodyfat should reduce (without eliminating) their portion sizes of carbohydrate in every meal.

Emphasising low Glycaemic Index (GI) carbohydrates

The GI is a score given to foods based on how rapidly the carbohydrates in food causes a rise in blood glucose after being consumed. A high GI means the food causes a rapid rise in blood glucose and a low GI means the food causes a more sustained release of glucose into the bloodstream.

Since a rise in blood glucose promotes insulin release we should emphasise low GI carbohydrates in our diet.

Emphasising low-density carbohydrates
Carbohydrate density describes the amount of carbohydrate a food contains per serve. Example of carbohydrates that are high density include, pasta, which contains 76.5 grams of carbohydrate per 100 grams and cereal, which contains approximately 67 grams of carbohydrate per 100 grams.

On the other hand, examples of carbohydrates that are low density include, broccoli, which contains a minuscule 0.5 grams per 100 grams and carrot which contains 6 grams per 100 grams.

Obviously the higher the carbohydrate density the greater the likelihood of the food causing a rapid rise in blood glucose. This, in turn, promotes insulin release which then promotes fat storage and stops fat burning and weight loss!

Ensuring each meal contains a portion of protein, fat and fibre
Not only does having protein, fat and fibre with the carbohydrates ensure a more ‘nutritionally complete’ meal but these nutrients also have the effect of slowing down the absorption rate of the carbohydrates, which allows a more sustained release of glucose into the bloodstream and therefore a reduced insulin response.

Quite often people will have a piece of fruit, a diet yoghurt or a low-fat muffin for their mid-morning or mid-afternoon meal in their quest to lose body fat.

Unfortunately, these foods alone don’t provide an adequate amount of all the nutrients required by the body and may also cause a rapid rise in blood glucose, halting fat loss in its tracks!

As a result, these foods should only be consumed with other foods to ensure a complete meal. For example, have a piece of fruit with some nuts, mix a small amount of cottage cheese with the yoghurt (it doesn’t taste that bad- honest!) or have a low-fat muffin with a protein shake.

From this information it is safe to conclude that high carbohydrate low fat diets as suggested by the Food Pyramid or the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating aren’t the best way to assist your weight loss efforts. Furthermore, a big question to ask yourself is this:

‘Since the Food Pyramid was designed by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), do their interests lie in looking after your health or in supporting the economy?

[NOTE: The base of the Food Pyramid recommends 6-11 serves a day of high density, mostly high GI, refined, grain-based carbohydrates. These are examples of carbohydrates that are the absolute worst for your weight loss efforts and overall health!]

In summary, your weight loss efforts will be greatly improved by consuming carbohydrates in the following way:

• Eat smaller, more frequent meals.

• Reduce your portion size of carbohydrate without eliminating it.

• Ensure all meals contain portions of carbohydrate, protein, fat and fibre.

• Slow the passage of glucose into the bloodstream by emphasising low-density and low GI carbohydrates.

If you make an effort to ensure you eat the examples of carbohydrates as suggested, you can literally watch the fat melt off your body! Go for it!
Last edited by EvilWombatQueen on Sat Sep 18, 2010 8:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The Big Deal About Carbs?

Postby starchvader » Wed Jul 21, 2010 12:16 am

Czarina wrote:There is no need to restrict carbs severely to lose weight...it is a pretty pointless exercise because once you incorporate carbs back in, a lot of the weight can be regained.

Check out http://www.calorieking.com.au for an healthy and sustainable way to lose weight.


why do you need to incorporate carbs in a diet in the first place? we didnt even eat them at all for millions of years up until the egyptians decided we should. plus the food pyramid was developed by kelloggs :lol:
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Re: The Big Deal About Carbs?

Postby Czarina » Tue Jul 27, 2010 11:18 am

starchvader wrote:
Czarina wrote:There is no need to restrict carbs severely to lose weight...it is a pretty pointless exercise because once you incorporate carbs back in, a lot of the weight can be regained.

Check out http://www.calorieking.com.au for an healthy and sustainable way to lose weight.


why do you need to incorporate carbs in a diet in the first place? we didnt even eat them at all for millions of years up until the egyptians decided we should. plus the food pyramid was developed by kelloggs :lol:


For optimum brain and bowel function, for starters...
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