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Exercise for Asthmatics

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Exercise for Asthmatics

Postby oostevens » Tue Nov 06, 2007 11:10 am

Hi.

My husband is an asthmatic. He always has his puffer on him, and does the regular peak flow to see how he is going, as well as having his ummmmm seritide (is that its name?)

Some nights he has a tight chest and doesnt end up doing any exercise, even though I know he would love to.

Is there anything he can do on those days/nights that won't make things worse, but would still be classed as a workout?

He also gets quite tired on the bike or treadmil and doesnt do it very long.

Anyone have any suggestions, i know he really wants to workout. I just need some advice as to what kinda exercises he should do.

Ta
[*RACHEL*]

YOU CAN DOOO IT!!!!!

[First goal: to reach 80kgs]
[Second goal: to reach 75kgs]

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Postby kate_turner2000 » Tue Nov 06, 2007 11:17 am

mick has bad asthma and is on seretide as well. he was just recently on atrovent, ventalin and prednesone (sp?)

we got rid of his peak flow meter though because the old lady on the box looked like she was giving a blow job LOL.. well she did!

mick is 50kg and cant put weight on at all but he really enjoys weights and whacking golfballs around the yard. he plays golf a couple of times a month and he also surfs and bodyboards. is your hubby able to get a punching bag?
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Postby Butterfly_Dawn » Tue Nov 06, 2007 11:19 am

I'm asthmatic too and I've found exercise to be one of the best things ever for it (along with moving from launnie's smog and starting to take my seretide regularly, but it's even improved over that with exercise). I haven't had to use my puffer in aaaagggggeeess whereas I used to have to have it at least once per week (I still carry it with me though).

Anything relatively gentle like slow cycling, or walking, preferrably not in really cold air. Breathe deeply in through nose, out through mouth. And ALWAYS take his reliever puffer just in case (and a mobile to call help if he gets that bad).

I'm naughty and sometimes at bedtime (when I tend to get it most frequently) I get just a touch of tightness/wheeze. I can never be bothererd getting up to get my puffer so I just use breathing to control it. Mandie will probably tell me off for that, but I promise that if it doesn't go away, I do get the puffer.
35kg lost. (November 2005 - October 2006)
15kg gained again (as at October 2010).
Back to the drawing board - Let's do this thing!

"You can't change the winds, but you can change the sails"

"Reach out and take control of what lands in your lap"

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Postby electrongirl » Tue Nov 06, 2007 11:24 am

I found this info on a health site:

Asthma and exercise


Being active is great for your health and wellbeing. Sometimes, however, the physical exertion of exercising or playing sport can trigger a bout of asthma. This is called ‘exercise-induced asthma’ (EIA). This kind of asthma is usually easily managed and should be part of any asthma management plan.

As well as being good for you, regular physical activity can help you manage your condition. Take time to learn how to manage your asthma so you can have a healthy, active lifestyle.

People with asthma should be able to participate in almost any sport or exercise. Scuba diving is the only sport not recommended. Most individuals with EIA can exercise to their full potential if the condition is properly treated. Many top athletes competing at national and international level have asthma.

Exercise-induced asthma
Most people with asthma have asthma symptoms if they exercise in dry or cold air. When at rest, you breathe through your nose and the air is warmed, moistened and filtered as it enters your body. When you exercise, you need more oxygen and so you breathe faster through your mouth. Your airways react to this cold, dry air and the muscles around them tighten.

Some of the symptoms of exercise-induced asthma include:

Wheezing
Coughing
A feeling of tightness in the chest
Breathlessness.
These symptoms can occur during or, more commonly, after exercise.

It is the type of exercise, the amount of time spent exercising and the intensity of exercise that is important. Typically, vigorous activity for six minutes or more in cold, dry air is more likely to trigger asthma.

Preparing for exercise
You can reduce the risk or prevent exercise-induced asthma by preparing for physical activity in a few simple ways:
Make sure your day-to-day asthma is well managed.
Use your asthma reliever medication around five to ten minutes before you warm up. Speak to your doctor for advice.
Always warm up with light exercise and stretching for 10 to 15 minutes before you play sport or exercise.
Always cool down.

If you get exercise-induced asthma during activity
If you feel the symptoms of exercise-induced asthma:
Stop what you’re doing.
Follow your Asthma Action Plan. If you do not have an Asthma Action Plan, take four separate puffs of your blue reliever medication (Airomir, Asmol, Bricanyl, Epaq or Ventolin). The medication is generally best taken one puff at a time via a spacer. Take four breaths from the spacer after each puff of medication.
Wait four minutes.
Only return to exercise or activity if you are free of symptoms.
If the symptoms don’t go away, or if they return while you’re exercising, use your blue reliever as before. Do not return to any exercise or activity for the rest of the day and see your doctor.
A ‘spacer’ is a special device shaped like a clear plastic football or tube through which aerosol inhaler medications are inhaled. Bricanyl is the only reliever medication available in a dry powder inhaler and cannot be used with a spacer.

When to avoid exercise
You should avoid exercise if:
Your asthma is not under control.
You have a cold or the flu.
Your peak flow meter reading is less than 80 per cent of your usual best.
Nikki - Aussie girl living in the USA with her soul mate. My blog: http://aus2usa.blogspot.com/

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Postby Mandie » Tue Nov 06, 2007 12:56 pm

Tegan - put your puffer in arms reach of the bed, then no excuses! :P

RE: the exercise - Nikki put up some good info. The key is NOT to exert yourself if your peak flow is too low. But, some gentle exercise - like slow cycling, or slow walking - should be well handled (provided he's well to start with).. you don't have to go super fast. Sure, it's less of a cardio workout if you "stroll", but if you stroll for an hour, it's still some decent exercise.

ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS have a puffer and a mobile phone.

Most deaths from asthma attacks occur because people think they can drive to hospital/their family/friends drive them to hospital. In a severe attack, you should call an AMBULANCE ASAP. Once the ambulance gets to you, they can put on oxygen and start giving you nebulisers, which is much better! Before the ambulance gets there, you should sit with your reliever (like ventolin), try to take deep breaths, and have a puff every 4 minutes until the ambulance comes.
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Postby oostevens » Tue Nov 06, 2007 1:04 pm

hubby has always got high on his peak flow. Like in the 700's which is above average or normal. So yeah. He was having a tight chest a bit but we recon it wa cos he wasnt taking his seretide. We bought some more last night so hopefully that will start working :)
[*RACHEL*]

YOU CAN DOOO IT!!!!!

[First goal: to reach 80kgs]
[Second goal: to reach 75kgs]

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Postby Butterfly_Dawn » Tue Nov 06, 2007 2:02 pm

Ditto what Mandie said about the ambulance. I think because it's so common, people forget that asthma is deadly and if you can't breathe, you need some pretty darn good first aid (the type that comes with flashy lights). The worst is that you can't breathe so you panic and tense up which makes it harder to breathe and so on and so forth. It really is scary.

And Mandie, I would put it near my bed, but then in the morning I forget to put it back in my pocket to ride to work and I'd rather have it there. I do get up and get it if I really need it, but I do find that those really minimal symptoms, I can control with breathing and they go away especially if I've got my preventative up to date (I remember there was a book around that taught breathing exercises to assist with asthma - choir always helped me too because of the breathing control required)
35kg lost. (November 2005 - October 2006)
15kg gained again (as at October 2010).
Back to the drawing board - Let's do this thing!

"You can't change the winds, but you can change the sails"

"Reach out and take control of what lands in your lap"

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Postby Mandie » Tue Nov 06, 2007 2:19 pm

Yup, fair enough, I know you're smart enough to do the right things Tegan. :)

And yeah, with the breathing control, you're so right.. it's why doctors often recommend swimming for asthmatics, because you control your breathing (as opposed to running, where you tend to pant) more and it helps!
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Postby Butterfly_Dawn » Tue Nov 06, 2007 3:53 pm

I did heaps of swimming as a tot on docs reccommendations...but then I started getting tonsillitis frequently due, we think, to the chlorine in the pool (which apparently weakens the immune system...which is why those top swimmers always have colds and flu etc). :roll: you just can't win.
35kg lost. (November 2005 - October 2006)
15kg gained again (as at October 2010).
Back to the drawing board - Let's do this thing!

"You can't change the winds, but you can change the sails"

"Reach out and take control of what lands in your lap"

User avatar
Butterfly_Dawn
 
Posts: 4151
Joined: Thu Nov 03, 2005 10:28 pm
Location: Hobart, Tas

Postby Mandie » Tue Nov 06, 2007 6:00 pm

bugger! yeah, its always something...
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